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  • Josh Goller

The Effectiveness of Social Distancing

Social distancing certainly has been touted as a way to help stop the spread of disease during the current COVID-19 pandemic. It’s easy to understand how reducing contact with others can greatly limit your chances of exposure to harmful pathogens carried by others. But just how effective is it? I think the video below illustrates that answer rather clearly.



That fluorescent gunk is literally all over the place after only 30 minutes, just from a “runny nose.” That said, there are a couple of things to point out from the video.




Adam, playing the “sick” individual, is going out of his way to spread his illness. He is touching everyone and everything around him. If you are sick, don’t be like Adam! I cannot stress enough how this is not alright.


Also, at the end of the video as the “germophobes” are being interviewed, Grant mentions that it is not a good idea to refuse a handshake when offered. This video is a few years old and the concept of social distancing wasn't a part of our national consciousness, so I think given a little tact it is totally acceptable to mention that given recent events you have decided to stop shaking hands for the time being but that you appreciate the gesture all the same.


Bottom line – social distancing is effective. This video gives us a great visualization of just how effective it can be when practiced diligently. But as the germophobes Grant and Tory illustrated, letting down your guard for even a little while can lead to you getting very sick. While they appeared far less contaminated than those that were not practicing social distancing or sound hygiene practices at all, it seems like they would have gotten sick just the same.


Vigilance is the name of the game. Do your part: wash your hands, maintain a safe distance, stay home, and for goodness sake don’t be like Adam and deliberately try to get people sick!


We’ll be back again next week, but until then hang in there everyone!

Josh


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